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ISOM Conversions & IOF Mapping Conference

ICOM 2018 Presentation

Easily convert symbol sets

Convert an existing file

  1. open your source (e.g. ISOM 2010) map
  2. save as with new name
  3. Map > Symbol Set Conversion…
  4. enter the target symbol set
  5. select the relevant crt file (e.g. ISMTBOM 2010)
  6. displayed in left list are source symbols and in right are target symbols
  7. for any unticked source symbols, complete or leave the target symbol
  8. OK
  9. in new map, Select > Select Objects by Symbol > Objects with unknown symbol, to identify symbols that were not converted.
  10. further information http://www.ocad.com/wiki/ocad/en/index.php?title=Symbol_Set_Conversion

Conversions available

Two step conversions

Some conversions such as OSM to MTBO do not have ready made crt files. Using a plain text editor you could create your own crt file perhaps using one of the existing ones as a base.

OSM to MTBO

If using the New Map Wizard to create an MTBO base map, you need to use a 2 stage process as there is no OSM to MTBO crt file.

Create the base map with ISOM 2017 as the target. Then use the Symbol set conversion process to get the base map to ISMTBOM 2017 symbols.
See my post on using the New Map Wizard to create base maps.

International Conference on Orienteering Mapping 2018

Presentations by OCAD Inc Staff

There were two presentations by OCAD Inc staff.

Hubert Klauser’s presentation covered two topics;

  • generalising orienteering maps with TPI contours
  • using the Check Legibility tool

Gian-Reto Schaad’s presentation was on Semi-automatic Extraction of Near-ground Vegetation from Lidar Data

School map symbols

School map from Mapping Commission work group (nice design!)

The IOF Mapping Commission presented their proposals for school orienteering map symbols.

It is interesting to see the variety of symbols currently in use for typical school objects.

Colours for the colour vision impaired

Adrian Uppill was a co-developer of a presentation on Solutions for orienteers with colour vision defects. If the Eureka Orienteers’ permanent orienteering course in Daylesford, VIC completes its funding, Adrian’s work on this topic will be put into practice.

Other presentations

The full list or presentations is at https://orienteering.org/presentations-from-icom-2018/
Videos at https://www.facebook.com/groups/485564718218028/videos/
The videos’ sound quality is poor.

Off the map

Michael Kenna’s magical trees.

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OCAD tools to create base maps

Towering cumulus over Leanganook

New Map Wizard

2018

Use New Map Wizard to quickly create a georeferenced orienteering base map. Even correctly oriented to magnetic north if you like. The process uses Open Street Map (OSM) and converts to your selected OCAD symbol set. You can easily add more symbol translations to the CRT translation file.

Simply want to georeference a new blank base map or any existing map? The process is much the same but use the resultant georeferenced map as a background map to georeference. Generally OSM major road junctions are best and they don’t have to be on the orienteering area.

OSM to OCAD via OCAD New Map Wizard
OSM data converted to OCAD – Daylesford, Wombat Hill and Railway Station

Check out the  2.5 minute video on screencast. Download an example OCAD map that also shows 5m contours derived from the time glutton DEM option.

WMS Server

2018, 12, 11

WMS Server (under Background Maps in menu) is a fast and efficient way of obtaining base map data in the form of background maps or map data.

A 12 minute mp4 video of the process using LandTasmania Spatial Web Services as an example, can be downloaded from Google Drive. (Unfortunately an audio issue with online Screencast prevents easy online viewing).

Topo map displayed via OCAD WMS Server function
Topo map displayed in WMS server

Page 23 of the LandTasmania LIST Spatial Web Services User Guide contains the URLs used in the video along with context. 

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OCAD & Mapping Snippets

1915 Vic Geo Survey Dunolly map extract

OCAD reminders

Some tips that tend to be overlooked.lightbulb

40%, 20% discounts ending

And another tip – the big discounts for updating OCAD 12 or 11 to 2018 finish at the end of next month. If you have been thinking about it, I suggest you either do it or diary it.

Team OCAD edition image4 clubs benefit from Team licences

Four clubs have taken advantage of the opportunity to acquire Team licences. In three of those clubs, some club members transferred their licences to the club. Then the club traded each licence in for two Team licences.

Massive savings, significant flexibility. Check out my recent post Hidden Value in OCAD Team Editions for more info.

GIS file conversions

A conversation that crops up more frequently in the lidar era is how to convert a file from one format to another. The FME Integrations Gallery may have the answer for you.

Conversion categories include CAD, GIS & Mapping, Lidar & Point Clouds. The Cloud version appears reasonably priced for say a state orienteering organisation. There is also possibilities for free versions.

Open source PDFsamDocument

Frustrated at the limitations of Adobe Reader and can’t justify Adobe Acrobat? Then take a look at the open source PDFsam.

PDFsam Basic is free and enables split, merge, extract pages, rotate and mix PDF files.  PDFsam Enhanced comes in 3 flavours giving you even more options at a reasonable price.

QuestaBird

Your kids looking for something more to do while waiting for you to finish the course? Or vice versa? QuestaBird is a mobile based adventure game with a purpose. Use your phone to photograph birds, butterflies and moths,  competing with others to collect the most species and the greatest number of animals in your area.

“Players are not only learning about their environment, they’re collecting data that helps protect it.  In effect they have become citizen scientists without even knowing it.”

Andrew Robinson, co-founder of QuestaGame

Downunder geospatial awareness ratingsgeospatial

Australia is ranked 14th and New Zealand 25th in terms of geospatial industry awareness according to Geospatial Media & Communications.

Criteria are data infrastructure, policy framework, institutional capacity, user adoption levels, industry fabric (whatever that means).

The top 10 starts with USA, and apart from Singapore, China and Canada, comprises European countries.

Your dream mapping career?

If you ski you might have seen his work. Jim Niehues, The Man Behind The Map.


The featured image is a very small segment of the 1915 Victorian Geological Survey County of Gladstone map. The detail, drawing and printing is of the highest quality but unfortunately does not show up on this image.

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OCAD Inc’s Advent Calendar

OCAD Inc logo

OCAD’s Advent Calendar of functionsTopo socks

If you are on Facebook or Twitter then it may be well worth your while following OCAD Inc for a stream of useful functions. December 1st is about the DEM Import Wizard.

December  2nd is on moving building edges easily. Bet many of you didn’t know that one.

December 3rd is for course planners being on automatic control descriptions.

These are great introductions to OCAD for tyro OCAD users and reminders for we more mature OCAD users.


Aiming off…

Santa and sack
Santa Jymbo delivers

Free delivery for our Pretex buyers to Canberra. If you will be there then save big on delivery costs.

Jim Russell will be in Canberra on 15th December 2017 and Australia Day 2018. Place your order online and request Jim’s delivery on the order notes.

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Become More Productive with OCAD in 2017 – Part 3

OCAD productivity through hardware, software, processes

Upgrading your PC on a limited budget

Check the OCAD wiki

When buying a new PC or Mac with OCAD in mind, the first port of call is the OCAD wiki section on Technical Data.

Memory vs Processor

Having to make that choice? My unquantified experience is to spend the money on a faster processor. I recently bought a new Asus 64-bit PC WIN 10 on a special that did not allow me to order over 4GB memory. The processor is an i7-4790. This PC replaced a 64-bit laptop with WIN10, an i5-2450M and 16GB memory. I had intended to buy more memory for the Asus but the difference in performance was so great that initially I had no need. I do have some very large OCAD files. Geekbench performance scores are 4,596 for that i5 and 13,094 for that i7.

But some months later I had a map requirement that led me to order more memory. When I loaded a large number of Nearmap aerial images as background to a large map, the PC ground away and after 30 seconds or so entered a comatose state (OCAD now provides a warning in that situation).  In theory, if I limited the viewable area of map, then many images would not need to be in memory at that moment, but that is not really practicable.

So I now have 20GB and all is sweet. If you do not use a lot of aerial images, or are prepared to have visible just those you work on at any given moment, then you will not experience this memory issue. See also this earlier post on CPU power.

SD drive

Mark Roberts’ experience shows a Solid State Drive (SSD) will load OCAD and files somewhat faster.

Larger and/or second screen

27" ASUS PB278
27″ ASUS PB278

When I upgraded to the new PC I also bought a largish (23″) 1920 x 1080 screen as recommended by Mark Roberts in this post. Wow! Even though this is smaller than Mark’s old screen, it is a significant advance over my laptop screen.

Probably an even greater cost/benefit is to have a second screen. I had an old Dell screen in the garage so cost was nil.  See Mark Roberts’ earlier tip on using a second screen.

Software

As OCAD has advanced, my need for external softwares in mapping has reduced. Nowadays I occasionally use Cad Viewer to quickly check out a Shape file before importing. I still frequently use GPS Utility to convert GPS files to OCAD readable GPX files. I also use it to get rid of multiple and extraneous track segments such as when I forget to turn off the GPS driving home. I could do that in OCAD but find the utility overall easier.

Processes

In the last 5 years or so, for me two processes stand out as being the most productive.

Master maps

Master map image
Master map in OCAD

Having a master map of an area that has a number of adjoining maps is top of my list because;

  • the master map enforces version control as all corrections are made to the master map
  • a master map simplifies control through a map library check out check in process
  • symbols are uniform across all maps
  • flexibility of map areas is hugely increased as any area can be ‘cut’ from a master map for an event

Drawbacks? Establishing version control can be quite difficult in the ‘relaxed’ club orienteering environment. But once firmly established it should become second nature. Ken Thompson has produced a detailed process for setting up and maintaining a master map system. It is basically similar to the system I use but adds processes suited to a club where the map librarian may change from time to time.

Symbol status manager (new in OCAD 12)

Symbol status manager dialogue
Symbol status manager

This OCAD function is very useful if you develop or maintain maps that are used for multiple types of orienteering such as foot and mtb. Being able to switch from one view to the other so quickly is a boon.

Got an OCAD or mapping productivity tip to share? Just enter it in comments or draft a post for publication.

 

 

 


Aiming off

Not quite contours - Paulo Mendes
Not quite contours – Paulo Mendes