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Australian Orienteer Summer Edition is Mapped

Geostationary Satellites

Orienteering map technology

The coming edition of the Australian Orienteer carries three articles relating to technology and orienteering maps. Continue reading Australian Orienteer Summer Edition is Mapped

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A Drone Goes Orienteering Mapping

Drone with camera

Drones in orienteering mapping?

This is not to claim that making orienteering maps is boring, as one dictionary suggests that a drone is  “A person who does tedious or menial work; a drudge” ….. on the contrary, anyone who knows me will know that I find the work stimulating and rewarding, and certainly not menial. Indeed making orienteering maps is one of my passions in life, and another (there are more!) is the theory of flight Continue reading A Drone Goes Orienteering Mapping

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Auto Generated Orienteering Maps for WOC 2016

Topo socks

Really? Auto generated orienteering maps?

Well yes and no. Read all about it on the WOC Sweden 2016 website. If you haven’t seen such maps before you will be surprised if not amazed. Continue reading Auto Generated Orienteering Maps for WOC 2016

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The Lost Art of Navigation?

Map and Compass are not dead in the great outdoors…

… according to Tarquin Cooper and British adventurers Alastair Humphreys and Tristan Gooley (also author of The Natural Navigator).

Read the article The Lost Art of Navigation to find out why map and compass should still be used in this age of GPSrs.

Lichen on all sides
Lichen on all sides

btw I rather wonder whether The Natural Navigator has the tip about finding direction by checking for lichen growing on the side of trees? This photo is of the north side of a sign in Wheatsheaf, VIC. If you didn’t notice the other sides, which were similarly lichened, then you would likely be in directional trouble.

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From GPS and Google Maps to Spatial Computing

Curious about spatial computing? Or more than curious?

Course logo
Course logo

This course from the University of Minnesota via Coursera delves into spatial computing for geographic information systems (GIS). Now that might seem heavy going but the course caters for three different goals of participants;

  • Curiosity – learn about one or two spatial concepts of interest to you
  • Concepts – learn about spatial concepts but not get involved in programming or statistics
  • Technical – the lot!

Why might this course interest you?

If, like me, you use data from various sources then you will doubtless have run into issues ranging from data formats to co-ordinate systems to projections to …. So you might want more than a passing knowledge of what you are dealing with.

I am hopeful the Curiosity track will increase my knowledge of co-ordinate systems and projections so I can bother Russell Rigby a little less. And if I can get through at least some of the Concepts track maybe I will further broaden my knowledge of ESRI Shape files and the like as I use them in nearly every map I produce.

This course introduces concepts, algorithms, programming, theory and design of spatial computing technologies such as global positioning systems (GPS), Google Maps, location-based services and geographic information systems. Learn how to collect, analyze, and visualize your own spatial datasets while avoiding common pitfalls and building better location-aware technologies.

Best of all…

It is free unless you specifically want a certificate of attainment.

You will find out that egocentric maps exist but they are not necessarily your maps 🙂 And did you know orienteering maps are allocentric?

Sign up here. But be warned, it does take a fair bit of time and commitment. 8 weeks of 4-10 hours per week. However I understand you have until Christmas to complete it.