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New OCAD features roll on

Uncertain about an OCAD subscription?

per March 2020 Australian Orienteer

Still uncertain whether to update from OCAD 11, 12 …? Check out these 2020 new features on top of those above, then head to ocad.com.au/shop.

  • Starter edition: now has Layout functionality to apply logos, legends, MN symbols, scale bars, print marks.
  • Course setting: also now has Layout functionality.
  • Preferences: Set default co-ord system.
  • Oribooklet users: Import GPX symbols assigned from Oribooklet. (A great app for smart device mapping).
  • DEM: TIFF DEM import.
  • Course Setting: Import courses and classes from csv/txt including number of runners and comment.
  • Export PDF: Support Geospatial PDF (WGS84) for georeferenced OCAD maps. Note, as yet these are not suitable for Avenza publication so continue to use world TIFFs.
  • Load symbols & colours, option ‘Add’: Uses added colour’s number if the number doesn’t exist in target colour table.
  • plus improvements to Legibility checks, Symbol sets, ISM conversions.
  • more to come including sketch layer for mobile.

1 year or 3 year subscription?

If you are teetering on the choice then here is a heads up. On 1st April 2020, the discount for 3 year subscription will reduce from 15% to 10%. ocad.com.au/shop.

OCAD subscription users

Temporary Backups

OCAD recently published a reminder re the availability of a temporary backup of your session. That setting is in Options>Preferences>File.

While you are there, select Help and check out the other useful options. Then take a look at Options > Back up and Restore Options. This allows you to save your Preferences and Shortcuts – very useful if you need to reinstall your OCAD or move to a new PC.

Do read the change list when updating

You load OCAD to work on a map and perhaps take an offered update right then. I suggest you don’t decide to read the list later. You are likely to forget and may overlook something important such as this change in the March update;

CHANGE Symbol Sets, Orienteering: Order of colors for ISOM 2017-2 and ISSprOM 2019 symbol sets improved.

Don’t get caught out.

OCAD 11 users

If you make use of your 2nd activation, or any activation after a reinstall, then please use the website activation method.

When you start the activation process in OCAD 11, you can choose between the option ‘Online Activation’ or ‘Website Activation’. http://www.ocad.com/howtos/online_activation_ocad_11.htm http://www.ocad.com/howtos/website_activation_ocad_11.htm The ‘Online Activation’ is not working any longer.

ISOM 2017-2 colours too weak for digital print?

Has the move to ISOM being expressed in CMYK rather than Pantone, been successful? Not entirely.

Some users are finding colours such as blue (lighter) and purple (magenta) to be inadequate in some situations. This is more likely to be true of MTBO where we are unable to bring the map closer to our eyes.

Provided you aren’t creating maps for an international event, you could consider the Swiss Frey colour palette. This is an update of a palette brought out 3 or 4 years ago to provide a more accurate colour rendition for digital print. The first palette was developed on a Xerox Versant, the latest on a current model production level Konica Minolta. Another colour of relevance to MTBO is line brown for contours. The Frey swatch has a dark brown which is very close to the brown Jim Russell and I developed for MTBO digital print some years ago.

The palette has colour numbers consistent with the ISOM 20187-2 palette. Thus using Map > Colours > Select colour swatch > Load colour swatch > ISOM 2017 Color Swatch Frey Digital Print makes it easy to change your ISOM palette to the Frey palette in whole or by moving specific colours. View an English translation of the German.

ISMTBO blues are close to the Frey blues. However you might like to use the Frey brown for lines (15 Braun 100% – Linienobjekt’ 30,70,100,0) to provide more legible contours. If using Load colour swatch to make the change, ensure you untick the 3 options at lower left of the swatches.

You might like to first print, on your intended digital press, this sample pdf of the Frey palette. The German/French sub-titles at left on the pdf translate as ‘Print Resolution’.

Off course

Thank Gladys West for your GPS capability

Gladys West poster

In A Mathematician Idolised, Cosmos magazine gave a brief account of Gladys West’s significant contribution to the Global Positioning System (GPS) that mappers are increasingly using. Gladys was a key developer of the first highly accurate geodetic earth model (geoid), that was the basis of the GPS.

More recently Cosmos expanded on that item with Science History: Gladys West Maps the Future.

If you watched the film or read the book Hidden Figures, Gladys West is a contemporary of those women. While they worked for NASA, she worked for the US Naval Weapons Laboratory. However, she was equally embraced by Air Force Space Command with her induction into the Air Force Space and Missile Pioneers Hall of Fame.

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Downunder Tutorials for Novices & Experts

Tarrawarra map leads OCAD mapping tutorial

How to create high quality orienteering base maps

Preface

This well presented and well illustrated tutorial was prepared by Barry Hanlon of WHO (Western & Hills Orienteers) with contributions from Ian Miller and Janet Morris.

The introduction sets the scene for current mapping. Note that references to OCAD 2018 also apply to OCAD 2019 which under the continued update model is the same product. In the 2020 subscription period, the product will drop the year suffix.

Gathering the data

Here Barry covers data sources and gathering. Some of these are NSW specific but other state equivalents should be readily identifiable by your club’s seasoned mappers. Lidar input is covered as is Kartapullautin.

Creating a base map in OCAD 2018+

Here we have the four key steps. These are followed by a note re use of Kartapullautin to better determine runnability.

Alternative mapping tools

This section covers Open Orienteering Mapper (OOM), OL Laser, LAS Tools and some useful links. Barry does say that if you use current OCAD, you wont need this information. It is great that he has catered for these other orienteering mappers.

Creating base maps with earlier OCAD

Russell Rigby’s Setting up an OCAD base map is just the ticket for mappers who have access to older versions.

More on LiDAR and orienteering mapping

Russel Rigby’s LiDAR for base Maps is a useful complement to Barry’s tutorial and to OCAD’s treatment of the topic.

Off course

Permanent Orieneering Course entry station sign

Finallyyyyy, the entry station sign for the new Eureka Orienteers’ Daylesford VIC permanent orienteering course (POC) was delivered and now erected. ACT orienteers will recognise the style.

This POC is unusual downunder in that users have the choice of participating by way of MOBO mobile app or traditional paper map. MOBO utilises QR codes on posts and was selected because it also provides the opportunity for another QR code on the post to showcase nearby natural or historic mining features in the reserve.

Wesley College, Clunes Campus used the POC 3 times recently (traditional maps) and were delighted with the outcomes for their students. Next year they are looking at a more challenging course for selected students and this will likely be provided via MapRun which doesn’t require fixtures at control sites.

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ISSprOM2019 update tools for OCAD 11 up

OCAD 11 & 12 users, help on ISSprOM2019 is a click away

Helpful ISSprOM2019 update documents and crt files have been prepared by Michael Wood with the help of other kiwi mappers. These include symbol sets for OCAD 11 which can also be used for OCAD 12.

The Orienteering NZ Mapping Bulletin dealing with ISSprOM2019 comes in two versions – one for clubs and the other for experienced mappers. Disseminating the sometimes complex ISM information in this way is a great idea as it enables non-mapper club experts to more easily get to grips with the issues and thus make better decisions on club mapping.

Sample of ISSprOM 2019 Symbols at 1:2,000 for Field Work

OCAD 11 & 12 users can get a symbol template for the new ISSprOM2019 standard. The file is for OCAD 11 but is readily usable by OCAD 12. OCAD current version users get that file during updates or via the means outlined in our recent Springtime 2019 Downunder eNews.

And there is even a pdf of the ISSprOM2019 legend (at right) especially for field work. Plus some other tools that OCAD 11 users might welcome.

Thank you NZOF mapping group. Here is the link for all the above www.mapsport.co.nz/mapresources.html

Off course

Monochrome map competition

Tongass mono map portion

These maps make you wonder whether a very legible modern monochrome orienteering map is possible. Kiwis will enjoy the very last in the series. MonoCarto 2019 Winners | somethingaboutmaps

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An Apology and a Tip

First, the apology

I just discovered that a MailChimp draft email I worked on a week or so ago was sent unintentionally to my customers and subscribers. I apologise for my error. I will revert to individual emails.

Last, the tip – OriBooklet

This is for those of you who do not get OCAD newsletters. This item is about a mobile based mapping app for OCAD users.

4. Oribooklet App – Mapping with a Cell Phone
Oribooklet is a free app for Android, made for mapping with a cell phone only. It has a simple and straightforward interface to map objects in the terrain. Once your field job is done, you can export a .gpx file, which you can later import in OCAD and assign to symbols.
At the moment, Oribooklet works with ISOM 2017-2, ISSOM 2007 and ISSprOM 2019, in English, Portuguese and Spanish. Many thanks to Haroldo Cavalcanti for designing the app and sharing it with the orienteering world.
For more information, see this slideshow.
For installation, go to Google Play Store.

In reading the app guide it seemed to me that this is very well designed. So I tried it out. The result is that I can recommend you try it if you think a mobile app may be useful in your mapping. Make sure you setup Preferences first, especially the amil address to which your Saved file will be sent. However, you can get the file from Documents/Oribooklet  in your mobile.

I did have an issue in that only 3 of the list of control symbol groups would show on my screen. In conversation with the designer Haroldo, it appears this isn’t uncommon on some Motorola models even though the app is set to conform to screen size. He is working on mine. I do get everything showing on my Lenovo TAB 7.

For the few of you who use an external GPSr via Bluetooth to a mobile, be aware that OriBooklet does not appear to pick up the mock GPS provider channel. It continues to rely on the mobile’s GPS device which on my old Moto E 2nd Gen probably isn’t even getting Glonass satellites. So while my GNSS Commander app was showing 20 to 26 satellites with 12 or so in use, OriBooklet via Moto was reporting between 6 and 8 – unsure whether that is ‘in use’ or ‘visible’. Haroldo is going to see what is involved in incorporating mock GPS provider reception into the app.

Summarising, it seems to me that this app is well worth trying out if you think mobile mapping will be useful to you.

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GNS 2000 Plus has 1 second recording

Correction to recent post

In my recent post on this device I sated that it recorded only every 5 seconds. Thanks to a tip from Rob Plowright who has an earlier model, I found that when transmitting via Bluetooth, you get 1 second records. In fact you get up to 3 records per second.

This makes the GNS 2000 Plus even more useful.

A quick look

The GNS 2000 Plus records a track point to the device every 5 seconds. However, data transmitted to a smart device via Bluetooth, whether or not also recording to the GNS device, gives 1 second intervals.

The GNSS Commander file records into its own data file only every second. This app is intended for high level use in that it handles data in respect of DGPS land stations. Therefore I believe the additional transmits to an external app such as OruxMaps may be a means of ensuring that at least one data record per second will get through in a more demanding environment.

Tip: If setting the function to record on the GNS device, carefully observe that the green light flashes quickly 3 times as the switching to effect this is time sensitive.